• Users Online: 3181
  • Print this page
  • Email this page

 
Table of Contents
CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 200-201

Neglected tropical diseases: Strengthening the prevention and control activities to move forward in the direction of elimination and subsequent eradication


1 Deputy Director – Academics, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Medical Education Unit Coordinator and Member of the Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission27-Jan-2022
Date of Decision03-Feb-2022
Date of Acceptance04-Feb-2022
Date of Web Publication12-Jul-2022

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Thiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District - 603108, Tamil Nadu
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcsr.jcsr_16_22

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 


Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs), refer to a group of diseases that are predominantly reported in tropical and subtropical regions of the globe. Considering that a number of diseases together constitute NTDs, their epidemiology is quite complex and a wide range of environmental attributes play their part in the causation and progression of the diseases. Moreover, NTDs have also been linked with disability, stigma & discrimination, school dropouts, and sickness absenteeism. As most of these diseases are vector-borne and have animal reservoirs, the containment part of these illnesses becomes a major public health concern. The approach to prevent, control, eliminate and eradicate neglected tropical diseases has been reformed based on the road map proposed by the WHO, wherein an integrated approach has been advocated. To conclude, there is an immense need to adopt concerted and well-collaborated actions for the containment of neglected tropical diseases. The policy makers and concerned stakeholders should join their hands together in the battle against NTDs to ensure that we make significant progress in this regard.

Keywords: Neglected Tropical Diseases, Prevention, World Health Organization


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Neglected tropical diseases: Strengthening the prevention and control activities to move forward in the direction of elimination and subsequent eradication. J Clin Sci Res 2022;11:200-1

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Neglected tropical diseases: Strengthening the prevention and control activities to move forward in the direction of elimination and subsequent eradication. J Clin Sci Res [serial online] 2022 [cited 2022 Aug 12];11:200-1. Available from: https://www.jcsr.co.in/text.asp?2022/11/3/200/350735



Neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) refer to a group of diseases that are predominantly reported in tropical and subtropical regions of the globe.[1] The NTDs comprise 20 diseases (such as Chagas disease, rabies, leprosy, dengue, trachoma, chikungunya, mycetoma, scabies, schistosomiasis and yaws) which tend to affect impoverished segments of the population that are plagued with poverty, with a major inclination towards women and children.[1],[2] The available global estimates depict that in excess of 1.7 billion people worldwide are in need of some form of prophylactic or therapeutic intervention for one or more of these diseases on an annual basis.[2] We must realise that these diseases have been associated with a significant amount of suffering, 0.2 million attributed deaths and loss of 19 million disability-adjusted life years.[2]

Considering that a number of diseases together constitute NTDs, their epidemiology is quite complex and a wide range of environmental attributes play their part in the causation and progression of the diseases.[3],[4] It is important to note that these NTDs are more common in those settings with poor access to sanitation, clean drinking water and healthcare delivery services.[1],[3] Acknowledging that the affected people are from disadvantaged backgrounds, from low socio-economic status, living in rural or remote or areas affected with humanitarian emergencies or conflicts, they tend to live in close proximity with the animals and vectors, their overall containment is challenging.[3],[4],[5]

Moreover, NTDs have also been linked with disability, stigma and discrimination, school dropouts and sickness absenteeism (absence from the workplace in the case of adults). In addition, there is a massive financial burden (out-of-pocket expenditures) on the individuals, families and communities seeking healthcare.[1],[4] This again results in poverty and then the vicious cycle of poverty leading to the acquisition of infection and vice versa continues repeating.[3] Thus, these diseases account for a significant impact on health, social and financial strain on billions of people, including a reduction in the productivity of the nation.[3],[4] Despite all these consequences, these diseases are not given the desired importance. Nevertheless, it is worth noting that if these diseases are not contained, we will fail to accomplish the vision of universal health coverage and the attainment of the Sustainable Development Goals.[2],[4],[5]

As most of these diseases are vector borne and have animal reservoirs, the containment part of these illnesses becomes a major public health concern.[2],[3] At the same time, containment of these NTDs through a common approach is also difficult; nevertheless, based on the recommendations of the World Health Organisation (WHO) and other international bodies, the One Health approach on the global scale has been advocated by the public health authorities, as it will significantly aid in the containment of zoonotic NTDs.[6],[7] On the positive front, due to the sustained efforts and political commitment, 43 nations have succeeded in their efforts to eliminate at least one of the NTDs.[2],[6] In addition, it is an encouraging sign that regardless of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic that has accounted for the disruption of health services, more than 750 million people worldwide received treatment for one or more of NTDs in the year 2020.[2],[6]

The approach to prevent, control, eliminate and eradicate NTDs has been reformed based on the road map proposed by the WHO, wherein an integrated approach has been advocated.[6],[8] The purpose of the revised approach is to expedite and coordinate various interventions (such as administration of prophylactic chemotherapy, strengthening the process of management of individual cases, promotion of vector control, involvement of veterinary sector and improvement in the water, sanitation and hygiene facilities.) for the same.[6],[7],[8] Moreover, we must realise that the above interventions will not deliver sustainable results unless we address the primary cause, which is poor living conditions and poverty.[9] This calls for the need for strong political commitment and multi-sectoral efforts to improve the quality of life of people in underprivileged settings.[3],[9]

NTDs have been acknowledged as one of the global public health concerns and there is an immense need to take concerted and well-collaborated efforts to respond to the rising incidence of these diseases. The policymakers and concerned stakeholders should join their hands together in the battle against NTDs to ensure that we make significant progress in this regard.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Sripa B, Leonardo L, Hong SJ, Ito A, Brattig NW. Status and perspective of Asian neglected tropical diseases. Acta Trop 2022;225:106212.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
World Health Organization. Neglected Tropical Diseases; 2022. Available from: https://www.who.int/health-topics/neglected-tropical-diseases #tab=tab_3. [Last accessed on 2022 Jan 27].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Engels D, Zhou XN. Neglected tropical diseases: An effective global response to local poverty-related disease priorities. Infect Dis Poverty 2020;9:10.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Hotez PJ, Damania A. India's neglected tropical diseases. PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2018;12:e0006038.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Berglund J. Combating neglected tropical diseases. IEEE Pulse 2019;10:10-4.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
World Health Organization. Ending the Neglect to Attain the Sustainable Development Goals: A Road Map for Neglected Tropical Diseases 2021-2030. Geneva: WHO Press; 2021. p. 1-22.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Laing G, Vigilato MA, Cleaveland S, Thumbi SM, Blumberg L, Salahuddin N, et al. One Health for neglected tropical diseases. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg 2021;115:182-4.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Bodimeade C, Marks M, Mabey D. Neglected tropical diseases: Elimination and eradication. Clin Med (Lond) 2019;19:157-60.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Sansom C. Neglected tropical diseases: Securing sustainability. Lancet Infect Dis 2018;18:502-3.  Back to cited text no. 9
    




 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
Abstract
References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed94    
    Printed2    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded17    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal