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REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 175-180

Opportunistic infections in patients with haematological malignancies in Nigeria


1 Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria/Medical Mycology Society of Nigeria, Lagos, Nigeria
2 Department of Hematology and Blood Transfusion, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
3 Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
4 Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria/ Medical Mycology Society of Nigeria, Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Bassey Ewa Ekeng
MD, Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria/Medical Mycology Society of Nigeria, Lagos
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jcsr.jcsr_76_21

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Haematological malignancies (HM) are common clinical conditions encountered in Nigeria. Patients with haematological cancers are immunocompromised and as such are at risk of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). The objective of this review was to highlight the paucity of data on IFIs in patients with HM in Nigeria and recommendations on the way forward. A literature search for publications from Nigeria on HM including case reports and reviews from 1961 to 2021 yielded 76 publications of which only 9 (11.8%) reported infections in HM. Eight publications documented infection by viruses while only one publication documented bacterial infection. Viruses (73/93, 78.5%) including human cytomegalovirus (n = 19, 20.4%), Hepatitis B virus (n = 15, 16.1%), hepatitis C virus (n = 6, 6.5%) and human T-lymphotropic virus (n = 2, 2.2%) were the commonest causative agents of infections with HIV (n = 31, 33.3%) as the predominant pathogen. Mycobacterium tuberculosis was the only bacterial agent (n = 20, 20.5%). Reports on infections in patients with HM were mostly from the South-South (n = 4), followed by South West (n = 3) and North Central (n = 2). There were no data on IFIs. The limited information on the profile of IFIs in patients with HM in Nigeria may account for the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with HM. Prospective studies should be carried out as a matter of urgency to bridge this knowledge gap.


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